allmesopotamia:

A fantastic shot of the Eanna Temple in Uruk (Iraq)
Information about the temple can be found here

allmesopotamia:

A fantastic shot of the Eanna Temple in Uruk (Iraq)

Information about the temple can be found here

2,893 notes   •   September 01 2014, 08:35 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
Clay tablet with the birth of Sargon of Akkad and his argument with the king of Kish, late 3rd millennium BCE, now in the Louvre, Paris.

Clay tablet with the birth of Sargon of Akkad and his argument with the king of Kish, late 3rd millennium BCE, now in the Louvre, Paris.

25 notes   •   August 31 2014, 11:30 AM
Facade of Inanna’s Temple at Uruk.
This is part of the facade of the temple of Inanna at Uruk. There are standing male and female deities in alternate niches. Each figure holds a vessel in his/her hands and pours life-giving water forth on to the earth. The cuneiform inscriptions on the bricks mention the name of the Kassite ruler Kara-indash as the person who ordered the building of this temple. Circa 1413 BCE. From Uruk, southern Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Pergamon Museum, Berlin).

Facade of Inanna’s Temple at Uruk.

This is part of the facade of the temple of Inanna at Uruk. There are standing male and female deities in alternate niches. Each figure holds a vessel in his/her hands and pours life-giving water forth on to the earth. The cuneiform inscriptions on the bricks mention the name of the Kassite ruler Kara-indash as the person who ordered the building of this temple. Circa 1413 BCE. From Uruk, southern Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The Pergamon Museum, Berlin).

101 notes   •   August 31 2014, 11:28 AM
#ancient   #inanna   #temple   #uruk   #mesopotamia   #history   

amorbidwitch:

Sickle Sword, Bronze; 1307–1275 B.C.
Middle Assyrian period, reign of Adad–nirari I
Mesopotamia

69 notes   •   August 30 2014, 05:42 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
allmesopotamia:

Conserving the pottery, terracotta and tablets from Ur
A conservator at the British Museum, writes about her work in the Ur Project.

allmesopotamia:

Conserving the pottery, terracotta and tablets from Ur

A conservator at the British Museum, writes about her work in the Ur Project.

79 notes   •   August 30 2014, 05:42 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE

massarrah:

Old Akkadian Administrative Text on Gypsum

This beautifully preserved administrative text from Nippur is recorded in Old Akkadian on a gypsum tablet. As the official language of records during the reigns of Sargon (c. 2334-2279) and his successors, Old Akkadian was used in administrative records such as the one above. It was also used in letters, and a few examples of literature in this early form of Akkadian have survived.

Sargon of Akkad is well-known for later legends about his origins, which chronicle how, having been abandoned, he was found floating on the Euphrates River in a basket made of reeds. His name in Akkadian, Šarru-kīnu, is a throne name meaning “The true (kīnu) king (šarru)”. (Sources 1, 2)

Old Akkadian, c. 2340-2200 BCE. 

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Photo from CDLI.

169 notes   •   August 30 2014, 05:41 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
ancient-mesopotamia:

Architectural Model, terracotta, Nippur, Iraq, ca. 2000 BCE, Penn Museum Object B15396. Source.

ancient-mesopotamia:

Architectural Model, terracotta, Nippur, Iraq, ca. 2000 BCE, Penn Museum Object B15396. Source.

40 notes   •   August 24 2014, 03:54 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
massarrah:

Image Title: Birs Nimrud, the Tower of Babel
From Nippur, or Exploration and Adventure on the Euphrates, by J. P. Peters (Source)

massarrah:

Image Title: Birs Nimrud, the Tower of Babel

From Nippur, or Exploration and Adventure on the Euphrates, by J. P. Peters (Source)

39 notes   •   August 24 2014, 03:50 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
This is not a question. I just wanted to say how much I admire all the stuff you do. There is so much out there that is just a waste of time. What you do is so educational and interesting. I am always amazed at people that make History boring and difficult. Also, a lot of people today just re-blog for the sake of re-blogging, trying to make a name for themselves. They have nothing to add. So thanks & keep up the good work!

Thank you very much, i’m really happy about messages like this ! 

15 notes   •   August 24 2014, 03:10 AM
massarrah:

Scene from the Balawat Gates
This engraving on the bronze Balawat gates, now on display in the British Museum, depicts a six-wheeled battering-ram. Several bronze bands that bear inscriptions and engravings once covered the Balawat gates, three large gates from the ancient city of Imgur-Enlil (modern Balawat) whose wooden portions are mostly decayed. The bronze bands depict scenes from the lives of the Neo-Assyrian kings, including military exploits like the one depicted in the image above, which comes from Everyday Life in Babylonian and Assyria by notable Assyriologist H. W. G. Saggs (available online). 

massarrah:

Scene from the Balawat Gates

This engraving on the bronze Balawat gates, now on display in the British Museum, depicts a six-wheeled battering-ram. Several bronze bands that bear inscriptions and engravings once covered the Balawat gates, three large gates from the ancient city of Imgur-Enlil (modern Balawat) whose wooden portions are mostly decayed. The bronze bands depict scenes from the lives of the Neo-Assyrian kings, including military exploits like the one depicted in the image above, which comes from Everyday Life in Babylonian and Assyria by notable Assyriologist H. W. G. Saggs (available online). 

22 notes   •   August 22 2014, 03:12 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
tammuz:

Relief on alabaster panel from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II at the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

Relief on alabaster panel from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II at the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

222 notes   •   August 22 2014, 03:12 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
sundegai:

The ‘Queen of the Night’ Relief, also known as the Burney Relief [detail].
Old Babylonian, 1800-1750 BC. Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London.

sundegai:

The ‘Queen of the Night’ Relief, also known as the Burney Relief [detail].

Old Babylonian, 1800-1750 BC. Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London.

79 notes   •   August 16 2014, 05:52 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
allmesopotamia:

The Pedestal of Tukulti-Ninurta I
Artifact: Stone monumentProvenience: AssurPeriod: Middle Assyrian period (ca. 1400-1000 BC)Current location: Vorderasiatisches Museum, BerlinText genre, language: Royal inscription; AkkadianCDLI page

allmesopotamia:

The Pedestal of Tukulti-Ninurta I

Artifact: Stone monument
Provenience: Assur
Period: Middle Assyrian period (ca. 1400-1000 BC)
Current location: Vorderasiatisches Museum, Berlin
Text genre, language: Royal inscription; Akkadian
CDLI page

82 notes   •   August 16 2014, 05:52 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
archaicwonder:

Neo-Assyrian Head of Pazuzu, Circa 8th-7th Century BC
Pazuzu was an Assyrian and Babylonian demonic god of the 1st millennium BC. He normally has a dog-like face like here, and where his body is depicted he has a scaly torso, a snake-headed penis, the talons of a bird and usually wings.
Although Pazuzu was a malevolent force, his image was used on amulets to ward off his enemy Lamashtu, a female demon that preyed on newborn babies and their mothers. The amulet was either worn by the mother or child and larger ones were placed above their bed on a wall.
His legend was adapted and used in The Exorcist films.

archaicwonder:

Neo-Assyrian Head of Pazuzu, Circa 8th-7th Century BC

Pazuzu was an Assyrian and Babylonian demonic god of the 1st millennium BC. He normally has a dog-like face like here, and where his body is depicted he has a scaly torso, a snake-headed penis, the talons of a bird and usually wings.

Although Pazuzu was a malevolent force, his image was used on amulets to ward off his enemy Lamashtu, a female demon that preyed on newborn babies and their mothers. The amulet was either worn by the mother or child and larger ones were placed above their bed on a wall.

His legend was adapted and used in The Exorcist films.

837 notes   •   August 15 2014, 03:56 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
Stone worshipper figurine from the temple Tell Asmar (Eshnunna)

Stone worshipper figurine from the temple Tell Asmar (Eshnunna)

35 notes   •   August 15 2014, 03:43 PM