ancientart:

Illustrated here in bas-relief are Assyrian war chariots with charioteers, and horsemen, in battle during the campaign against the kingdom of Elam. It was this campaign depicted which brought Elam under Assyrian rule in 645 BCE. These artworks come from the palace of Ashurbanipal (668-627 BCE) in Niniveh.

Artefact courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France, AO 19909. Photos taken by Mbzt.

July 22 2014, 12:59 PM   •   475 notes   •   Via: barbarianconspiracy   •   Source: ancientart
Awesome blog!
lvperca Asked

thanks a lot and enjoy ;P

chthoniandreams:

Stone lion’s head
Neo-Assyrian, about 680-670 BCFrom Sippar, southern Iraq
This lion’s head of white limestone comes from the Temple of Shamash. Known as the Ebabbar (‘Shining Temple’), it was one of the most important traditional and prestigious religious centres in Mesopotamia. Rulers sent offerings to Shamash and there are records of numerous kings restoring and rebuilding the temple.
This head, which was originally inlaid, bears a worn inscription naming the Assyrian king Esarhaddon (680-669 BC) and his father Sennacherib. It is not clear, therefore, whether this is a Babylonian or an Assyrian piece. Esarhaddon was responsible for restoring the capital city of Babylon following its destruction by Sennacherib in 689 BC.
Lions were regularly represented in Mesopotamian art on wall reliefs and as elements of furniture. The lion represented the power of nature and is often associated with the king, as it was his duty to defeat the forces of nature that the lion represented.
[Information from the British Museum]

chthoniandreams:

Stone lion’s head

Neo-Assyrian, about 680-670 BC
From Sippar, southern Iraq

This lion’s head of white limestone comes from the Temple of Shamash. Known as the Ebabbar (‘Shining Temple’), it was one of the most important traditional and prestigious religious centres in Mesopotamia. Rulers sent offerings to Shamash and there are records of numerous kings restoring and rebuilding the temple.

This head, which was originally inlaid, bears a worn inscription naming the Assyrian king Esarhaddon (680-669 BC) and his father Sennacherib. It is not clear, therefore, whether this is a Babylonian or an Assyrian piece. Esarhaddon was responsible for restoring the capital city of Babylon following its destruction by Sennacherib in 689 BC.

Lions were regularly represented in Mesopotamian art on wall reliefs and as elements of furniture. The lion represented the power of nature and is often associated with the king, as it was his duty to defeat the forces of nature that the lion represented.

[Information from the British Museum]

July 14 2014, 09:11 AM   •   85 notes   •   Via: massarrah   •   Source: predatories

karduniash:

Stamp seal of “kissing” bears found at the Northern Mesopotamian site of Hamoukar (circa 3,500 B.C.) dating to the Middle Uruk period. Though the site of Hamoukar seemed to lie outside Uruk colonial political hegemony locals began to experiment with styles of material culture clearly influenced by southern Mesopotamian mediums and motifs. This seal is clearly a northern recapitulation of the southern “heraldry” animal seal motifs. It’s also kind of adorable. Perhaps unintentionally so.

This blog is leaning far too heavily towards the cute side of artifacts rather than my typical penchant for Lovecraftian horror. I’ll have to fix that.

July 14 2014, 09:11 AM   •   45 notes   •   Via: massarrah   •   Source: karduniash
"The Law Codes of Hammurabi" written on Clay Tablet

"The Law Codes of Hammurabi" written on Clay Tablet

tammuz:

Head of Gudea, ruler of the Sumerian city of Lagash in Southern Mesopotamia. The diorite stone sculpture dates back to around 2090 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY. 
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

Head of Gudea, ruler of the Sumerian city of Lagash in Southern Mesopotamia. The diorite stone sculpture dates back to around 2090 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY. 

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

July 12 2014, 07:10 PM   •   187 notes   •   Via: megacosms   •   Source: tammuz
allmesopotamia:

Detail of painted sandal from King Ashurnasirpal II with attendants; Nimrud, c. 865 BC.       
[British Museum]

allmesopotamia:

Detail of painted sandal from King Ashurnasirpal II with attendants; Nimrud, c. 865 BC.       

[British Museum]

July 11 2014, 09:52 AM   •   88 notes   •   Via: massarrah   •   Source: allmesopotamia
ancient-mesopotamia:

Gate of the Citadel of Sargon II, Dur Sharrukin (photo taken during excavation in 1840’s).  742-706 BCE.  Khorsabad, Iraq.

ancient-mesopotamia:

Gate of the Citadel of Sargon II, Dur Sharrukin (photo taken during excavation in 1840’s).  
742-706 BCE.  Khorsabad, Iraq.

July 11 2014, 06:59 AM   •   1,130 notes   •   Via: dolphinsirius   •   Source: ancient-mesopotamia
massarrah:

Linear Elamite Inscription on a Vase
This silver vase bears a royal inscription in Linear Elamite, a writing system used in Elam during the Bronze Age. (Source)
Elamite, c. 2200 BCE.

massarrah:

Linear Elamite Inscription on a Vase

This silver vase bears a royal inscription in Linear Elamite, a writing system used in Elam during the Bronze Age. (Source)

Elamite, c. 2200 BCE.

July 10 2014, 04:58 PM   •   72 notes   •   Via: massarrah   •   Source: massarrah
A Sumerian Classroom Dating Back To C. 2000 B.C.

A Sumerian Classroom Dating Back To C. 2000 B.C.

July 10 2014, 01:24 AM   •   124 notes
massarrah:

Bilingual Sumerian-Akkadian Hymn to Ishtar
This tablet from the Library of Ashurbanipal at Nineveh is a hymn to Ishtar, goddess of love, fertility, and war. While the prayer is originally in Sumerian, every other line gives an Akkadian translation (visible in the placement of line dividers after every group of two lines), which suggests that even in antiquity, Sumerian may have begun to be difficult to understand. It is likely that Sumerian was no longer spoken after about 2000 BCE, but it was preserved in sacred and scholarly texts in Mesopotamia for the next two millennia, analogously to the way Latin is preserved in certain genres and scholarly contexts alongside modern languages today. (Source)
Nineveh, Neo-Assyrian, c. 911-612 BCE.
British Museum.

massarrah:

Bilingual Sumerian-Akkadian Hymn to Ishtar

This tablet from the Library of Ashurbanipal at Nineveh is a hymn to Ishtar, goddess of love, fertility, and war. While the prayer is originally in Sumerian, every other line gives an Akkadian translation (visible in the placement of line dividers after every group of two lines), which suggests that even in antiquity, Sumerian may have begun to be difficult to understand. It is likely that Sumerian was no longer spoken after about 2000 BCE, but it was preserved in sacred and scholarly texts in Mesopotamia for the next two millennia, analogously to the way Latin is preserved in certain genres and scholarly contexts alongside modern languages today. (Source)

Nineveh, Neo-Assyrian, c. 911-612 BCE.

British Museum.

July 09 2014, 05:05 AM   •   161 notes   •   Via: massarrah   •   Source: massarrah

ancient-mesopotamia:

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archaicwonder:

Neo-Assyrian Head of Pazuzu, Circa 8th-7th Century BC
Pazuzu was an Assyrian and Babylonian demonic god of the 1st millennium BC. He normally has a dog-like face like here, and where his body is depicted he has a scaly torso, a snake-headed penis, the talons of a bird and usually wings.
Although Pazuzu was a malevolent force, his image was used on amulets to ward off his enemy Lamashtu, a female demon that preyed on newborn babies and their mothers. The amulet was either worn by the mother or child and larger ones were placed above their bed on a wall.
His legend was adapted and used in The Exorcist films.

archaicwonder:

Neo-Assyrian Head of Pazuzu, Circa 8th-7th Century BC

Pazuzu was an Assyrian and Babylonian demonic god of the 1st millennium BC. He normally has a dog-like face like here, and where his body is depicted he has a scaly torso, a snake-headed penis, the talons of a bird and usually wings.

Although Pazuzu was a malevolent force, his image was used on amulets to ward off his enemy Lamashtu, a female demon that preyed on newborn babies and their mothers. The amulet was either worn by the mother or child and larger ones were placed above their bed on a wall.

His legend was adapted and used in The Exorcist films.

July 08 2014, 06:36 AM   •   242 notes   •   Via: fuckyeahgods   •   Source: archaicwonder
shiningjasmin:

shiningjasmin
"Ashurbanipal hunting lions". King Ashurbanipal is in foreground.
Relief that comes from Nineveh, North Palace.
Art of the ancient Assyrians. 650 B.C.
British Museum, London.

shiningjasmin:

shiningjasmin

"Ashurbanipal hunting lions". King Ashurbanipal is in foreground.

Relief that comes from Nineveh, North Palace.

Art of the ancient Assyrians. 650 B.C.

British Museum, London.

July 08 2014, 05:43 AM   •   68 notes   •   Via: shiningjasmin   •   Source: shiningjasmin
nosex:

lamassu, the human headed, winged bull guardian of the ancient mesopotamian people. lamassue statues stood (often over fourteen feet high) at the entrance of palaces, cities, and homes of rulers. more modest representations guarded the homes of common citizens. often, the bulls were made with five legs (from either the front or side perspective, the bull appeared to have anatomical appendages). from the side, the bull would appear to be in stride. from the front, it appeared to stand. the lamassue was a protective and fearful gatekeeper spirit.

nosex:

lamassu, the human headed, winged bull guardian of the ancient mesopotamian people. lamassue statues stood (often over fourteen feet high) at the entrance of palaces, cities, and homes of rulers. more modest representations guarded the homes of common citizens. often, the bulls were made with five legs (from either the front or side perspective, the bull appeared to have anatomical appendages). from the side, the bull would appear to be in stride. from the front, it appeared to stand. the lamassue was a protective and fearful gatekeeper spirit.

July 08 2014, 05:40 AM   •   168 notes   •   Via: nosex   •   Source: nosex