zeldathemes
Legacy of Tiamat

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tammuz:

Relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch (the word for eagle in Arabic is Nisr) on the walls of the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). The god Nisroch is associated with the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who conquered and destroyed Babylon. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

Relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch (the word for eagle in Arabic is Nisr) on the walls of the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). The god Nisroch is associated with the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who conquered and destroyed Babylon. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

hybridvivisexual:

Bronze Head of King Sargon of Akkad, 2306 B.C

hybridvivisexual:

Bronze Head of King Sargon of Akkad, 2306 B.C

archaicwonder:

A Sumerian Alabaster Female Worshiper - Early Dynastic II-III, circa 2900–2550 BC

Such figures with clasped hands have been identified as worshipers and are thought to have been placed in the cellae of the temples as votive figures.

She is shown standing with her hands clasped in prayer, emerging from beneath a long cloak, clasped at the neck, with a fringed edge, both the cloak and underdress with a long tufted fringe at the hem, the bare feet standing on an integral base, wearing a tall polos on her head with a thick band and wide brim at the neck, with prominent nose, pointed chin and small mouth, the eyes, hair and eyebrows hollowed for now-missing inlays.

archaicwonder:

Marble Cylinder Seal, Mesopotamia, Middle Assyrian period, c. 1250–1150 BC
A Winged Hero Pursuing Two Ostriches
In one of the most striking Middle Assyrian seals, a hero pursues an adult ostrich, possibly representing the earthly equivalent of the griffin, the conveyor of death. The fleeing ostrich, with its head turned back in fear and fury and its feathers bristling, ranks among the greatest Mesopotamian depictions of animals. In the biblical Book of Job (39:13–17), the ostrich is considered a malevolent creature because it disdains its young, which may account for the presence of the young ostrich and enhances our understanding of this extraordinary seal.

archaicwonder:

Marble Cylinder Seal, Mesopotamia, Middle Assyrian period,
c. 1250–1150 BC

A Winged Hero Pursuing Two Ostriches

In one of the most striking Middle Assyrian seals, a hero pursues an adult ostrich, possibly representing the earthly equivalent of the griffin, the conveyor of death. The fleeing ostrich, with its head turned back in fear and fury and its feathers bristling, ranks among the greatest Mesopotamian depictions of animals. In the biblical Book of Job (39:13–17), the ostrich is considered a malevolent creature because it disdains its young, which may account for the presence of the young ostrich and enhances our understanding of this extraordinary seal.

clioancientart:

Assyrian protective spirits on an alabaster panel from the palace at Nineveh, 645-635 BCE. Despite appearances, these figures are not fighting but are protecting against any evil that might approach from two directions. The British Museum, London.
Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

clioancientart:

Assyrian protective spirits on an alabaster panel from the palace at Nineveh, 645-635 BCE. Despite appearances, these figures are not fighting but are protecting against any evil that might approach from two directions. The British Museum, London.

Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

nie-photography:

cuneiform writing in Pergamon museum, Berlin, Germany
the cuneiform is the oldest known writing next to the egyptian hieroglyphics
© Stefanie Schafzahl

nie-photography:

cuneiform writing in Pergamon museum, Berlin, Germany

the cuneiform is the oldest known writing next to the egyptian hieroglyphics

© Stefanie Schafzahl

massarrah:

Royal Inscription from the Old Akkadian Empire
Inscribed on limestone, this cuneiform royal inscription tells of the construction of the Marad temple by the Akkadian king Naram-Sin’s grandson, Lipit-Ili. Naram-Sin is the first Mesopotamian king to have claimed himself to be divine and, in later Akkadian literature, is remembered as a king whose hubris made him fall out of favour with the gods.
c. 2250 BCE.
Louvre Museum. Photo credit: Jérôme Galland. (Source)

massarrah:

Royal Inscription from the Old Akkadian Empire

Inscribed on limestone, this cuneiform royal inscription tells of the construction of the Marad temple by the Akkadian king Naram-Sin’s grandson, Lipit-Ili. Naram-Sin is the first Mesopotamian king to have claimed himself to be divine and, in later Akkadian literature, is remembered as a king whose hubris made him fall out of favour with the gods.

c. 2250 BCE.

Louvre Museum. Photo credit: Jérôme Galland. (Source)

Horned Women IX:  dated to 2600-2350 bce, Sumeria, Mesopotamia; Early Dynastic lll.

Horned Women IX:  dated to 2600-2350 bce, Sumeria, Mesopotamia; Early Dynastic lll.

massarrah:

Clay Brick of Nebuchadnezzar II
Remembered as a successful statesman and builder, Nebuchadnezzar II (reigned 605-562 BCE) was one of the last independent Babylonian kings. This seven-line inscription in monumental cuneiform is typical of stamped bricks laid down in his building projects to commemorate his kingship and his contributions to the city. (Source)
Babylon, Neo-Babylonian, 7th-6th centuries BCE.
British Museum.

massarrah:

Clay Brick of Nebuchadnezzar II

Remembered as a successful statesman and builder, Nebuchadnezzar II (reigned 605-562 BCE) was one of the last independent Babylonian kings. This seven-line inscription in monumental cuneiform is typical of stamped bricks laid down in his building projects to commemorate his kingship and his contributions to the city. (Source)

Babylon, Neo-Babylonian, 7th-6th centuries BCE.

British Museum.

Mesopotamian relief depicts Ashurbanipal and his queen drinking wine.

Mesopotamian relief depicts Ashurbanipal and his queen drinking wine.

hivernucleaire:

Protective spirit holding a cone, from Dur-Sharrukin. 713–706 BCELouvre Museum

hivernucleaire:

Protective spirit holding a cone, from Dur-Sharrukin. 713–706 BCE
Louvre Museum

massarrah:

Protective Cover for a Babylonian Sun-God Tablet  
This fired clay cover served as a protective cover for a cuneiform tablet about the sun-god, Šamaš. Found in the temple to Šamaš in Sippar, the cover originally belonged to the Babylonian king Nabu-apla-iddina, who reigned in the 9th century BCE. When it was rediscovered by the Neo-Babylonian king Nabopolassar, who reigned 200 years later, it was broken, so the king had it replaced but kept alongside the old, damaged one in a box. Just as we value and preserve history today, so too did the Neo-Babylonian kings of the first millennium BCE possess a strong awareness of their past and the need to preserve its relics. (Source)
Neo-Babylonian, 860-850 BCE, Sippar.
British Museum.

massarrah:

Protective Cover for a Babylonian Sun-God Tablet  

This fired clay cover served as a protective cover for a cuneiform tablet about the sun-god, Šamaš. Found in the temple to Šamaš in Sippar, the cover originally belonged to the Babylonian king Nabu-apla-iddina, who reigned in the 9th century BCE. When it was rediscovered by the Neo-Babylonian king Nabopolassar, who reigned 200 years later, it was broken, so the king had it replaced but kept alongside the old, damaged one in a box. Just as we value and preserve history today, so too did the Neo-Babylonian kings of the first millennium BCE possess a strong awareness of their past and the need to preserve its relics. (Source)

Neo-Babylonian, 860-850 BCE, Sippar.

British Museum.

ancientart:

Terracotta model cart, Mesopotamia, dates to the second half of the 3rd millennium BCE.

Animal-shaped pottery vessels mounted on oversized wheels had a long history in the ancient Middle East. This early example has the head of a ram with curving horns. Liquid poured into the hole on top flowed out of the opening in the animal’s snout. A loop on the front allowed the attachment of a cord so that the vessel could be pulled. Such vessels have been excavated in both temples and houses. They were probably used in religious or funerary rituals. 

Courtesy & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections. Accession number: 87.77